Topic 4: Emerging Technology Impacts

Emerging Technology Impacts

“How do you believe the chiropractic profession will accommodate the impacts of emerging technologies?”

Future Perceptions Survey respondents have indicated that the chiropractic profession is not well prepared to accommodate the potential impacts of emerging technologies such as increasing reliance on virtual patient encounters. What can the profession do to embrace and assimilate emerging technologies, and be ‘future ready’?

We would love to hear your thoughts!

“What can the profession do to embrace and assimilate emerging technologies, and be ‘future ready’?”
This discussion board community is intended to spark forward-looking discussions, and aid in developing the focal points for interactive events with facilitators. We invite you to share your thoughts and ideas, in a forward-looking manner. Posts that specifically reference or are intentionally divisive and/or overtly negative towards any individual or organization, or intended as a barrier-building “history lesson”, may be blocked. We thank you for your participation and your thoughtful, forward-looking thoughts and insights!

18 Comments

With regard to telehealth, an emerging healthcare megatrend, we are very far behind our competitive provider groups,. This is particularly the case with regard to the establishment of an interstate provider compact. The FCLB is investigating this now and we need to support this effort.

The significance of an interstate licensure compact cannot be overstated. I respect that FCLB is working on this issue, but it will take a significant push from state association leaders to make this happen. For perspective, Physical Therapy has a licensure compact that already includes 29 states with several other states considering legislation as well.

Our Federally Qualified Health Center primary care providers are now providing telemedicine visits 60% of the time. Chiropractic services may be offered through telemedicine technology but we must be covered by third-party payers for the service. It is my understanding the many of the VA chiropractic providers are offering telemedicine visits because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

What chiropractic services beyond consultation can be done via tele-chiropractic? I have an old comic strip from the 90’s that shows a desktop being placed on someone’s back and “downloading ” an adjustment. Yes, consulting a potential and current patient using electronic means is appropriate but can not replace an exam and an adjustment. The virtual appointment can only be taken so far in this hands on profession. It has a place but can not replace.

Occupational Medicine is mandated by the Federal Government to companies. Parts of it are hands on, parts of it can be done virtually. All of it can be done by DCs and none of it is controlled by MD’s. It is about safety and wellness. The chiropractic profession should take over this field and become synonymous with “Corporate Health” and be the company doctor for companies, cities, counties, state and federal agencies.

Having integrated into a medical center within the Occupational Medicine department, my experiences do lead me to concur with the suggestions by Dr. Raker. I suggest that integration of chiropractic physicians as board certified specialists is a very reasonable strategy.

Have strong leadership that provides a direction for how individual doctors proceed. Willingness to do what is right not what is going to please everyone.

Inclusion of more active rehab strategies and self care strategies which can be taught virtually may be a viable use of emerging technologies.

That sounds wonderful; however, in NYS, and with CMS, we can only be reimbursed for the 98940, 98941 and 98942 codes for treatment procedures. 99213 is defunct. Exams would be limited and third party payers only pay for re-evaluations maybe once every 2-3 years.

I am more concerned about the demands that will be placed upon us to have websites, patient portal with access to EMR records on line.

Not much for a hands on profession but we can do nutritional work and maybe functional medicine if the doctor so desires. Chiropractic is a disruption technology in that we are taught holistic care of the musculoskeletal system. We are the only profession approaching this from a primary care approach to musculoskeletal. We must remove the medicare barrier and become part of the larger systems but reimbursement must first fit the work, something that is not happening now. If you do not believe we disrupt things, take a look at a patient with back and knee pain being sent for treatments and therapies that can’t possibly work, while nobody follows the best practices but everyone treats something. On the other hand, a few visits with a chiropractor who resolves multiple complaints

As medicine continues to evolve and more specialties present themselves, in order to maximize our effectiveness for our patients and legitimize our relevance, universal scope of practice and board certified specialties should be required. For example, if a practice specializes in rehab, orthopedics, pediatrics, gynecology, internal disorders, nutrition etc…a legitimate board certification that requires clinical residency and re-certification should be required for all DCs. It is time to acknowledge that the chiropractic medical education is only the foundation of our education, not the end point, and board specialty will allow DCs to standardized their Specialty and universal full scope will allow for reciprocity and an opportunity to practice effectively anywhere. We also need to acknowledge that DCs are not just spine doctors and that MOST DCs do not only practice as monotherapy (CMT only) providers. So yes the CMT is characteristic of our profession but should not limit us and we need to instead focus on how the universal chiropractic philosophy of innate intelligence and the universe philosophy of chiropractic as a wholistic form of medicine can indeed be effectively applied to multiple specialities. I propose for those who want to limit their expertise to spinal health only, consider a specialty board certification in that area of medicine.

Excited for the emerging tech. We will need to adapt to the concept that our services goes beyond just the physical contact and that we can still examine, diagnosis, educate and treat patients with emerging tech. Nothing will replace the face to face however, we can reduce the administrative burdens and expand on our services to accommodate our patients needs more efficiently thru tech advancements.

Excited for the emerging tech. We will need to adapt to the concept that our services goes beyond just the physical contact and that we can still examine, diagnosis, educate and treat patients with emerging tech. Nothing will replace the face to face however, we can reduce the administrative burdens and expand on our services to accommodate our patients needs more efficiently thru tech advancements.

It could be exciting. However, how likely is it that a chiropractor is going to feel effective sitting on computer screen for patient interactions? It’s a time suck- setting up, waiting for patients to “arrive.” and then returning for follow-up. Basically, I am not sold on it.

People like reproducible results and tests. How can chiropractic incorporate more things like Foot Leveler’s foot scans? Patients go crazy for these scans and share them with their friends. We need more ways to “prove” results and need for our services. This also plays well when interacting with other health professionals.

Emerging technologies also include devices not typically seen in chiropractic care that fall into the field of bioenergy, but may be useful in evaluation and management. The lesson of Telemedicine at the beginning of COVID-19 shut downs showed there are things to be learned and to work on being treated fairly by those who provide payment to chiropractors for services rendered (insurance, etc.) There is a need to regularly address new technologies as a profession and develop guidance documents for their use within Scope.

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MORE INFORMATION

For more information about the Future of Chiropractic strategic visioning and planning project, please contact:

Elizabeth Klein, Executive Director
Congress of Chiropractic State Associations
Phone: (503) 922-2933
lizz@chirocongress.org
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